Portfolio Management: Theory & Practice

Since our inception, the core mission of Schultz Collins has been to help investors make rational, informed and intelligent investment decisions. Prudent decision making, however, requires a basic understanding of capital markets and a familiarity with evolving research in the field of Financial Economics. In 2006, we published Portfolio Management: Theory and Practice to summarize… Read more »

References for Portfolio Management: Theory & Practice

Below is a by chapter listing for all the links in our Portfolio Management: Theory & Practice publication. Preface Note 09 – A Gentle Introduction to Investing Note 13 – Course Notes for USF Masters of Science in Financial Analysis Chapter One Note 09 – Well-Performing Portfolios and Well-Disguised Insolvency Note 13 – Diversification vs…. Read more »

A Gentle Introduction to Investing

How can people make good investment decisions when they don’t know the difference between a stock and a bond? Many beginning investors are intimidated by the prospect of learning about economics and finance – subjects that, for many, are deadly dull – or of meeting with salespeople trying to push investment products and schemes, or… Read more »

Money Market Reform: What You Should Know

The ubiquitous money market mutual fund has been a hot topic at the U.S. Treasury Department and the Securities Exchange Commission (SEC) since the Great Recession and Financial Crisis of 2008/2009. The Government’s concerns are based on actions taken by institutional investors during the crisis when a large institutional money market fund could no longer… Read more »

Course Notes for USF Masters of Science in Financial Analysis

School of Management 746: 2014 Portfolio Management Notes to Readers The following pages are my course syllabus and course lecture notes for the course in Portfolio Management offered to the 2014 cohort seeking a Masters of Science degree in Financial Analysis at the University of San Francisco.  The notes are not a stand-alone exposition.  Rather,… Read more »

Chicken Little and the Financial Crisis

The pipe dream of all investors is to achieve attractive investment return with little or no risk. Some financial firms capitalize on this dream by shaping their marketing campaigns accordingly. The implication is that the firm has the expertise to identify forthcoming market declines—the new catchphrase is “market bubbles”—and to guide investors safely through periods… Read more »